Don't believe everything you read on #ElectionDay Facebook, Twitter

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Don't believe everything you read on #ElectionDay Facebook, Twitter

Fake social media accounts are spreading misinformation to suppress voter turnout or to fool people on election day.

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Don't believe everything you read on #ElectionDay Facebook, Twitter

Jessica Guynn , USA TODAY 7:05 p.m. EST November 8, 2016
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Social Media platforms are spoon feeding information to users about voting. Any questions, just look. While twitter bots are taking over the conversations. Alyse Barker (@IamAlyseBarker) has the story. Buzz60

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Fake social media accounts are quickly spreading misinformation to suppress voter turnout or to influence how people vote, keeping social-media companies busy trying to delete them all.(Photo: Tony Gutierrez, Associated Press)

SAN FRANCISCO — Public service announcement on election day: Don't believe everything, or maybe anything, you read on social media.

Fake social media accounts are spreading misinformation to suppress voter turnout or to influence how people vote, keeping social-media companies busy trying to delete them all.

People are advising each other to double-check the source of information and to be careful what they share with friends and followers.

"Believe NOTHING from social media 'breaking news' today, at least not until you've checked further. Again nothing," tweeted Dan Gillmor, who teaches digital media literacy at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication:

A prime example: A fake Twitter account masquerading as CNN politics tweeted that Trump was leading in the first Florida exit polls.

Other fake Twitter accounts encouraged minorities and immigrants to avoid polling places because of round-ups for outstanding warrants or raids by immigration officials. Twitter, which says it had counted 25 million election-related tweets by 6 pm ET, quickly deleted the accounts.

🚨 This is from a fake Twitter account pic.twitter.com/WIoHXtyQs4

— BuzzFeed News (@BuzzFeedNews) November 8, 2016

Watch out for fake claims by pro trump trolls on #ElectionDay. #GOTV instead and read the facts: https://t.co/mtumW3lvmopic.twitter.com/nJrDXwZ5P1

— Maks Czuperski (@MaksCzuperski) November 8, 2016

Talking to family about the election really underscores just how problematic fake news on Facebook is.

— Selena Larson (@selenalarson) November 8, 2016

It's common for fake news to bubble up during major news events. But the spread of false information during this tumultuous election season has accelerated.

Last week Buzzfeed reported tweets that appeared to show the Hillary Clinton campaign encouraging people to vote by text, which is not possible.
Twitter deleted the accounts from Donald Trump supporters. CEO Jack Dorsey told a BuzzFeed reporter in a tweet that he was "not sure how this slipped past us."

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