Nearly half of Americans didn't vote — not even for Harambe

Nearly half of Americans didn't vote — not even for Harambe

18
Shares
What's This?
A Democratic Party supporter, wearing a U.S. stars and stripes head scarf, reacts as she watches election results come in at the Democrats Abroad election night party at Marylebone Sports Bar and Grill, London, U.K., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.A Democratic Party supporter, wearing a U.S. stars and stripes head scarf, reacts as she watches election results come in at the Democrats Abroad election night party at Marylebone Sports Bar and Grill, London, U.K., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.
Image: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty ImageS
2016%2f10%2f03%2f8a%2fscreenshot20161003at5.13.14pm.149f5By Kerry Flynn2016-11-09 19:19:54 UTC

Donald Trump is the president-elect for the United States, and we're still just now starting to understand how he won.

The narratives are already flying, but it's important to look at the numbers. Nearly half of eligible voters (231,556,622 people) did not vote in the 2016 presidential election, according to data of early turnout rates compiled by the United States Election Project and crunched by Josh Nelson. The full results may not be available until two weeks.

The early data found that of the U.S. population:

  • 46.6% didn't vote

  • 25.6% voted for Hillary Clinton

  • 25.5% voted for Donald Trump

  • 1.7% voted for Gary Johnson

It wasn't the lowest turnout in history, however. About 49 percent of eligible voters did not participate in the 1996 election, in which Democratic candidate Bill Clinton beat Republican candidate Bob Dole.

For the swing states, tallied by Jason Andrews:

  • 36.5% didn't vote

  • 29.9% voted for Clinton

  • 30.9% voted for Trump

  • 1.9% voted Johnson

As for how that compares historically, Republicans were down slightly. Democrats, however, failed to show up.

A quick look at turnout data: It seems 2016 was nothing special for the Rep-candidate. It's the Dem-candidate that didn't get the vote out. pic.twitter.com/wby3gta26m

— D Yanagizawa-Drott (@yanagiz) November 9, 2016

As to the lack of participation in voting, it may not have been out of laziness or disdain. Tuesday was the first election since the 2013 Supreme Court ruling against the Voting Rights Act. The changes added new voter identification requirements.

For example, in some states, voters must present a photo ID. Hundreds of polling sites and locations were closed or changed.

Who knew closing over 800 polling stations would make a difference. #VotingRightsAct

— Matt Murphy (@MattMurph24) November 9, 2016

The latest poll numbers also indicate that Clinton may have just barely squeezed out a win in the popular vote. An estimated 25.6 percent of eligible voters named Clinton while 25.5 percent voted for Trump.

When you narrow the numbers down to those who did vote, Clinton had 48 percent (59,580,545 votes) compared to 47 percent (59,341,558 votes) for Trump, according to the Associated Press.

As for demographics, the data also presents some important details.

Sarah Huckabee, a senior advisor to Trump, said that he had overwhelming evangelical support.

.@realDonaldTrump won Evangelicals 81%-16%. Biggest margin for any GOP presidential candidate ever. Proved decisive.

— Sarah Huckabee (@SarahHuckabee) November 9, 2016

Topics: Business, Donald Trump, Election 2016, Hillary Clinton, polling, polling place, voting, Voting rights act

SHARE THIS
Previous Post
Next Post